RHODY LIFE

At the Warwick Showcase

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It is not a good sign when HBO and Netflix show better movies than you get “At The Movies.”

Warwick Showcase has added the ultra-violent “The Hitman’s Wife’s Bodyguard,” a sequel to “The Hitman’s Bodyguard,” and it is not our cup of tea. Nor are “Peter Rabbit 2: The Runaway” and “12 Mighty Orphans,” a true story about a football team of orphans during the Depression.

“The Sparks Brothers,” a documentary about brothers who supposedly were the favorite band for favorite bands for five decades, is playing at Warwick and at the Avon. Somehow we missed all of that, as did people of all ages we queried.

All is not lost, however, if you want to see a great musical on the big screen.

IN THE HEIGHTS

****

(Broadway blockbuster)

Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Broadway blockbuster of a musical comes to the big screen with spectacular choreography filling the Latino neighborhood of Washington Heights.

The music and dance routines are loud and splashy, especially the one in the pool, and include pop and rap with a Latin flair.

This is a tale about “community” and the dreamers within city streets. Whether from Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Cuba or other islands, they have all come to America for a better life.

“In The Heights” shows little of the negative side of the poverty and crime of New York City, focusing on the good things that its residents dream will happen.

There are love stories, but very little sexual behavior. There is no violence. There are subtle signs of prejudice, as shown through one of the girls who goes off to Stanford.

Anthony Ramos is excellent as the bodega owner Usnavi, as are the other young actors.

Mirana plays a supporting role as the flavored ice street vendor. If you stay through the credits, you’ll have an added treat.

If you like Broadway musicals, you should love “In the Heights.” The big screen provides the vehicle to expand the dance numbers with hundreds showing their skills. And wait until you see two of them dancing on the side of a high-rise building.

Rated PG-13 with some minor profanity, and over 2½ hours long.

On Netflix

“High on the Hog”

is a fabulous three-part documentary featuring Black chef and food writer Stephen Satterfield, who travels to Benin, South Carolina and Texas exploring African and African-American culture influenced by their sense of family and food.

Season two of

“Lupin”

follows up on the “gentleman burglar” Assane, who is influenced by the adventures of the famous literary character in this exciting caper series from France.

The series revolves around our antihero seeking revenge for his father, who was convicted of stealing his employer’s 20 million euro Queen’s necklace.

The series begins and ends with two incredible capers, having you rooting for the “Master of Escape.”

movies, cinema

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